Exhibitions

 151 Byng St, Orange
 02 6393 8444
 02 6393 8199
 museum@orange.nsw.gov.au

Current Exhibitions

Inherit: old and new histories (from 5 September 2020)

‘The Canobolas and the surrounding district, about nine miles by road south-west of Orange, New South Wales, 1936’ by Herbert Gallop.

Inherit: old and new histories brings together both familiar and less well-known stories from across the Central West. Exploring our region’s history, the exhibition highlights big events and significant personalities, as well as the lives and experiences of everyday people. Told through more than 100 objects, these are the stories that have shaped our past and present.

Inherit is Orange Regional Museum’s new long-term exhibition.

 

 

 

Code Breakers: Women in Games (8 August 2020 – 14 October 2020)

The Gardens Between: Licensed courtesy of The Voxel Agents

Press play on Code Breakers, the first Australian exhibition celebrating the achievements of women working in the games industry. Whether it’s making commercial hits or indie titles, these women know games, contributing as directors, programmers, developers, artists, writers, producers and designers. Inside the exhibition you can play everything from platformers, RPGs and digital board games to graphical adventures and puzzlers, there’s something for everyone, at every skill level.

An ACMI touring exhibition.

Coming Soon

A Portrait of Australia: Stories through the lens of Australian Geographic (21 October 2020 – 22 November 2020)

Photograph by Colin Beard

This exhibition celebrates the bush, the outback, the coast and the people who live there. Featuring photographs from the Australian Geographic archive, it will transport you to some of the most rugged and remote parts of the country where you will discover the remarkable stories of ordinary Australians.

A travelling exhibition from the National Museum of Australia, developed in collaboration with Australian Geographic.

Hearts and minds: wartime propaganda (25 November 2020 – 14 March 2021)

Norman Lindsay, ?, 1918, lithograph printed in colour, ARTV00078, Image courtesy of the Australian War Memorial

An Australian War Memorial Touring Exhibition.

Propaganda has been used to influence audiences for as long as recorded history. By presenting facts selectively and using loaded language to provoke emotional reactions rather than rational responses, it seeks to promote the agenda of a particular group.

Posters were an ideal means of communicating propaganda: impermanent yet public, they were designed to be noticed, and could be printed and distributed quickly in large numbers. The Australian War Memorial holds a large collection of wartime posters from government–issued campaign posters to handmade posters protesting the war in Vietnam. Hearts and minds: wartime propaganda introduces this collection, featuring home-front propaganda from the First and Second World Wars.

Past Exhibitions

Regenerate (28 March – 16 August 2020)

‘Regenerate’ installation, created by students from 14 local primary schools.

Regenerate is an exhibition by local school children exploring the responses of Australia’s bushland to fire. Taking inspiration from Mount Canobolas and the 2018 bushfires, this exhibition explores how native eucalypt species on the mountain regenerate after fire.

This exhibition is developed through the SPARKE learning network, in collaboration with Orange Regional Museum and Orange Regional Gallery.

 

 

 

Capturing Nature: Early photography at the Australian Museum 1857 – 1893 (28 March 2020 – 2 August 2020)

Sperm Whale flipper, Megaptera longimana. Photo (c) Australian Museum

Australia’s earliest scientific photographs are revealed in a new exhibition, Capturing Nature.

Taken from the Australian Museum’s extensive archival collection of glass plate negatives, 65 large-format photographic prints showcase the scientific discoveries of Australian Museum scientists between the 1850s and 1890s. The exhibition also tells the story of the advent of photography in the young colony, less than 20 years after the birth of photography in Europe.

A touring exhibition created by the Australian Museum.

 

Underworld: Mugshots from the Roaring Twenties (1 November 2019 – 1 March 2020)

Arthur Caddy, 6 March 1929. NSW Police Forensic Photography Archive, Sydney Living Museums.

Descend into Sydney’s seedy underworld in our new photographic exhibition revealing the dark side of the Roaring Twenties. Explore more than 130 candid and compelling mugshots taken by New South Wales Police between 1920 and 1930. Known as the ‘Specials’, they are unlike any found elsewhere in the world.

Immerse yourself in all things Underworld with the stunning accompanying book and an exciting line-up of public programs.

Underworld: Mugshots from the Roaring Twenties is a travelling exhibition from Sydney Living Museums.

 

 

All in a Day’s Work (7 June 2019 – 13 October 2019)

Ben Gleeson paints road markings at the corner of Anson and Summer Streets, 1955. CWD Negative Collection, courtesy Orange & District Historical Society.

All in a Day’s Work provides a rare insight into the daily life of people at work in the Orange district between 1955 and 1974. This exhibition features captivating photographs from the Central Western Daily negative collection, held by Orange & District Historical Society. All in a Day’s Work is curated by Orange & District Historical Society and is presented as part of the society’s 70th anniversary celebrations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Art of Scientific Illustration (19 April 2019 – 30 June 2019)

The Art of Scientific Illustration features images and scientific specimens from the NSW Biosecurity Collections. Explore techniques used by scientists and artists over the last century to document and communicate their research, and learn why these works were created. This exhibition is presented in partnership with the NSW Department of Primary Industries.

Paddock to Plate (April 2018 – April 2019)

Paddock to Plate: a history of food and wine in Orange and district celebrates the history of food and wine in the Orange region, revealing how growing, processing, distribution and consumption of food has changed over time.

The exhibition starts with the mountain, an ancient volcano, which created the soils and climate that attracted indigenous people, then others from across the world. Through over 350 historic objects and photographs, ‘Paddock to Plate: a history of food and wine in Orange and district’ takes audiences on an adventure of exceptional flavours and shares the stories of the innovative people that created them.

Journeys (November 2016 – February 2018)

Journeys: people place stories explores the region, its people and place through time. Beginning with the region’s first inhabitants, Journeys explores the connection to country told through stories and artefacts of the Wiradjuri people, prior to and following the crossing of the Blue Mountains and eventual settlement by in the region by Europeans.

The journey continues by examining the significance of the landscape both as a rich mineral resource and as a place of cultural and environmental significance. The ever present Mt Canobolas has influenced settlement patterns, acted as a place of spiritual significance and more recently Lake Canobolas has offered the regions sports people a place to perfect their skills.

Transport technologies from the Cobb & Co coach, to railways and motor transport have changed the way people journey in the region and beyond. Developments in transport brought economic prosperity to historic villages across the region, while new communication technologies have changed the way our lives are documented and how we connect.

Plan your visit

Venue Information

Open 9am-4pm daily (closed 25 December).

Entry to the Museum is free. Group visits are welcome and free of charge, but please contact us to make a booking for groups of 10 or more.

Facilities

Bathrooms, including disabled and baby changing facilities, are available on site.

Parking is available in front of the Museum on Byng Street and in the Council carpark accessed from Lords Place. Larger vehicles (including buses) can find parking on Peisley Street.

Accessibility

Orange Regional Museum is fully accessible for prams and wheelchairs. A courtesy wheelchair is available for use.

Privacy Statement

  • Address: 151 Byng Street, Orange, NSW 2800
  • Phone: (02) 6393 8444
  • Email: museum@orange.nsw.gov.au